Constructivist emotionally-oriented model

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Draft

1 Definition

  • The Constructivist emotionally-oriented model (CEO) is a "model of web-based learning which emphasizes safety, challenge, and new thinking, and offers several strategies to enhance the emotional experience of learners."
  • The CEO instructional design model of web-based education emphasizes safety, challenge and new thinking and includes several strategies to enhance the emotional experience of learners.
  • Emotions have been neglected in education and online education, in favor of a heavy emphasis on cognition and rationality. (MacFadden, 2005: Abstract).

See also: Astleitner's FEASP model and the emotion article.

2 The Model

The table below, summarizing the CEO model is copyright by Robert MacFadden, Marilyn A. Herie, Sarah Maiter and Gary Dumbrill (2003) and reproduced here with permission by Robert MacFadden. (Retrieved 19:27, 1 June 2006 (MEST) from Past & Present Workshops).

Stage Purpose Activity Potential Feelings of Learners

Safety

To create a safe learning environment that facilitates risk taking and examining ones ways of thinking

Construct rules to foster free communication and ensure safety. Monitoring of communication to ensure compliance and safety

Safety, support & acceptance

Challenge

To provide the opportunity for participants to critically examine their knowledge and world views

Introduce exercises and processes that allow participants to step outside their existing ways of thinking

Disequilibrium, confusion, anxiety, frustration in a context of safety support & acceptance

New thinking

To create opportunities for engaging with new knowledge and gaining new ways of viewing the world

Introduce alternative knowledge and ways of viewing the world

"Ah ha!" moments leading to a new equilibrium, satisfaction, exhilaration

3 Links

4 References

  • MacFadden, R.J. Dumbrill, G., Maiter, S. (2000). Web-based education in a graduate faculty of Social Work: Crossing the new frontier. New Technology in the Human Services. Vol. 13, No.2.
  • MacFadden, R. J. (2005). Souls on Ice: Incorporating emotion in web-based education. In R. J. MacFadden, B. Moore, M. Herie, & D. Schoech, (Eds.), Web-based education in the human services: Models, methods, and best practices. (pp. 79-98). NY, London, Victoria: The Haworth Press.
  • MacFadden, R. J., Maiter, S., & Dumbrill, G. D. (2002). High tech and high touch: the human face of online education. Journal of Technology in Human Services, 20(3/4), 238-300.
  • MacFadden, R.J., Herie, M., Maiter, S., Dumbrill, G. (2005b). Achieving high touch in high tech: A constructivist, emotionally-oriented model of web-based instruction. Journal of Teaching in Social Work 25 (1/2) 21-44. DOI 10.1300/J067v25n01_02 , ISSN 0884-1233
  • MacFadden, R.J., Herie, M., Maiter, S., Dumbrill, G. (2005c). Achieving high touch in high tech: A constructivist, emotionally-oriented model of web-based instruction. In Beaulaurier, R., Haffey, M. Technology in Social Work Education, New York: Haworth Press (same as above)