Metacognitive literacy/CRESST self-assessment questionnaire 1996

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This questionnaire is described in Neil and Abedi (1996). [1]

See also: Metacognitive literacy/CRESST metacognitive questionnaire 1998


Directions. A number of statements which people have used to describe themselves are given below. Read each statement and indicate how you thought during the test. Find the word or phrase which best describes how you thought and circle the number for your answer. There are no right or wrong answers. Do not spend too much time on any one statement. Remember, give the answer which seems to describe how you thought during the test.

Not at all, Somewhat, Moderately so, Very much so

1. I was aware of my own thinking.

2. I checked my work while I was doing it.

3. I attempted to discover the main ideas in the test questions.

4. I tried to understand the goals of the test questions before I attempted to answer.

5. I was aware of which thinking technique or strategy to use and when to use it.

6. I corrected my errors.

7. I asked myself how the test questions related to what I already knew.

8. I tried to determine what the test required.

9. I was aware of the need to plan my course of action.

10. I almost always knew how much of the test I had left to complete.

11. I thought through the meaning of the test questions before I began to answer them.

12. I made sure I understood just what had to be done and how to do it.

13. I was aware of my ongoing thinking processes.

14. I kept track of my progress and, if necessary, I changed my techniques or strategies.

15. I used multiple thinking techniques or strategies to solve the test questions.

16. I determined how to solve the test questions.

17. I was aware of my trying to understand the test questions before I attempted to solve them.

18. I checked my accuracy as I progressed through the test.

19. I selected and organized relevant information to solve the test questions.

20. I tried to understand the test questions

References

  1. Harold F. O’Neil, Jr., & Jamal Abedi (1996). Reliability and Validity of a State Metacognitive Inventory: Potential for Alternative Assessment, CSE Technical Report 469, National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing (CRESST), Graduate School of Education & Information Studies, University of California, Los Angeles, https://www.cse.ucla.edu/products/reports/TECH469.pdf (retrieved March 2016).

O’Neil, H. F., Jr., Sugrue, B., Abedi, J., Baker, E. L., & Golan, S. (1992). Final report of experimental studies on motivation and NAEP test performance (CSE Tech. Rep. No. 427). Los Angeles: University of California, National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing.