Worm Watch Lab

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Cs Portal > List of citizen science projects > Worm Watch Lab - (2013/11/15)

Screen Shot 2013-11-15 at 11.51.05.png
Screen Shot 2013-11-15 at 11.51.05.png
CCLlogo.png
CCLlogo.png


IDENTIFICATION

Participant's homepage
Start date : 2013/06/30
  • Beta start date : N/A
  • End date : Still open.
Subject
  • Medical and health sciences > biology, genetics, medicine, neuroscience (biology/medicine/neuroscience)
  • Others in the same subject areas: Cell Slider
  • Others projects about biology/medicine/neuroscience: Cell Slider, Eterna, EyeWire, Fold It

Description We need the public’s help in observing the behaviour of tiny nematode worms. When you classify on wormwatchlab.org you’re shown a video of a worm wriggling around. The aim of the game is to watch and wait for the worm to lay eggs, and to hit the ‘z’ key when they do. Purpose By watching these worms lay eggs, you’re helping to collect valuable data about genetics that will assist medical research by helping us understand how the brain works and how genes affect behaviour. ? Research question The idea is that if a gene is involved in a visible behaviour, then mutations that break that gene might lead to detectable behavioural changes. The type of change gives us a hint about what the affected gene might be doing. Although it is small and has far fewer cells than we do, C. elegans has almost as many genes and because we share a common ancestor even with worms, many of them are closely related to human genes. This presents us with the opportunity to study the function of genes that are important for human brain function in an animal that is easier to handle, great for microscopy and genetics, and has a generation time of only a few days.

TEAM

MAIN TEAM LOCATION
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MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK

Project team page http://www.wormwatchlab.org/#/team Leader: Institution: MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge Partner institutions: Medical Research Council (MRC) as part of the Medical Research Council Centenary year programme, Medical Research Foundation Contact: team@zooniverse.org

USER TASKS

CONTRIBUTION TYPE: data analysis
PARTICIPATION TYPOLOGY:


GAMING GENRE NONE
GAMING ELEMENTS: NONE

COMPUTING
THINKING
SENSING
GAMING

Tasks description When you classify on wormwatchlab.org you’re shown a video of a worm wriggling around. The aim of the game is to watch and wait for the worm to lay eggs, and to hit the ‘z’ key when they do. Interaction with objects

Interface

  • Data type to manipulate: other
  • interface enjoyment:
  • Interface usability: easy to use

GUIDANCE

GUIDANCE
  • Tutorial: Somewhat
  • Peer to peer guidance: Somewhat
  • Training sequence: Somewhat
FEEDBACK ON
  • Individual performance: Somewhat
  • Collective performance: Somewhat
  • Research progress: Somewhat

Feedback and guidance description

COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY TOOLS
  • Communication: website, blog, other
  • Social Network: Twitter, Facebook
  • Member profiles:: N/A
  • Member profile elements:
NEWS & EVENTS

Community description

  • Community size (volounteers based)
  • Role:
  • Interaction form:
  • Has official community manager(s): N/A
  • Has team work N/A
  • Other:
  • Community led additions:


Other information

1 PROJECT

Url:http://www.wormwatchlab.org/
Start date: 2013/06/30
End date: Still open
Infrastructure: Zooniverse

2 TEAM

Official team page:http://www.wormwatchlab.org/#/team
Leader:
Institution: MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge
Partner institutions: Medical Research Council (MRC) as part of the Medical Research Council Centenary year programme, Medical Research Foundation
Contact: team@zooniverse.org
Main location: MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK

3 PROJECT DEFINITION


3.1 Subject

Medical and health sciences > biology, genetics, medicine, neuroscience (biology/medicine/neuroscience)

3.2 Description

We need the public’s help in observing the behaviour of tiny nematode worms. When you classify on wormwatchlab.org you’re shown a video of a worm wriggling around. The aim of the game is to watch and wait for the worm to lay eggs, and to hit the ‘z’ key when they do.

3.3 Purpose.

By watching these worms lay eggs, you’re helping to collect valuable data about genetics that will assist medical research by helping us understand how the brain works and how genes affect behaviour.

3.4 Research question.

The idea is that if a gene is involved in a visible behaviour, then mutations that break that gene might lead to detectable behavioural changes. The type of change gives us a hint about what the affected gene might be doing. Although it is small and has far fewer cells than we do, C. elegans has almost as many genes and because we share a common ancestor even with worms, many of them are closely related to human genes. This presents us with the opportunity to study the function of genes that are important for human brain function in an animal that is easier to handle, great for microscopy and genetics, and has a generation time of only a few days.

4 ABOUT PARTICIPANT TASKS


4.1 Tasks description.

When you classify on wormwatchlab.org you’re shown a video of a worm wriggling around. The aim of the game is to watch and wait for the worm to lay eggs, and to hit the ‘z’ key when they do.

4.2 .

Grey typology Participation typology Contribution type:
Computing: NO Thinking: NO
Sensing: NO Gaming: NO
Crowdsourcing Distributed intelligence
Participatory science Extreme citizen science
Science outreach
Data collection
Data analysis
Data interpretation --------
Gaming
Genre: Gaming elements:
Interface
Data type to manipulate: other interface enjoyment:
Interface usability: easy to use
Member profiles::N/A
Member profile elements:


5 ABOUT GUIDANCE AND FEEDBACK


Guidance Feedback on
Tutorial and documentation: SOMEWHAT
Training sequence: SOMEWHAT
Peer to peer guidance: SOMEWHAT
individual performance: Somewhat
collective performance: Somewhat
research progress: Somewhat

5.1 .

6 COMMUNITY


Tools News & Events

Communication: website, blog, other
Social Network: Twitter, Facebook

Main news site: http://blog.wormwatchlab.org/
Frequency of project news updates: less than weekly
Type of events:
Frequency of events :

Community description

Community size (volounteers based):
Role: Interaction form:
Has official community manager(s): N/A
Has team work N/A

Other information about community:
Community led additions:

7 OTHER PROJECT INFORMATION




Screen Shot 2013-11-15 at 11.51.05.png Yes [[has completion level::Medium]

http://www.wormwatchlab.org/#/team

MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK team@zooniverse.org

Yes biology, genetics, medicine, neuroscience Medical and health sciences biology/medicine/neuroscience By watching these worms lay eggs, you’re helping to collect valuable data about genetics that will assist medical research by helping us understand how the brain works and how genes affect behaviour. The idea is that if a gene is involved in a visible behaviour, then mutations that break that gene might lead to detectable behavioural changes. The type of change gives us a hint about what the affected gene might be doing. Although it is small and has far fewer cells than we do, C. elegans has almost as many genes and because we share a common ancestor even with worms, many of them are closely related to human genes. This presents us with the opportunity to study the function of genes that are important for human brain function in an animal that is easier to handle, great for microscopy and genetics, and has a generation time of only a few days. MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK Worm Watch Lab When you classify on wormwatchlab.org you’re shown a video of a worm wriggling around. The aim of the game is to watch and wait for the worm to lay eggs, and to hit the ‘z’ key when they do. data analysis


other, other: videos Thinking: no Computing: no Sensing: no Gaming: no



easy to use N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

N/A

N/A website, blog, other Twitter, Facebook


http://blog.wormwatchlab.org/

less than weekly


N/A


Medium



Bibliography

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Facts about "Worm Watch Lab"
Has addressMRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK +
Has citizen science subject areabiology/medicine/neuroscience +
Has collective performance feedbackN/A +
Has community managerN/A +
Has community toolsWebsite +, Blog + and Other +
Has completion levelMedium +
Has contact person URLhttp://team@zooniverse.org +
Has data types to manipulateother +
Has field of sciencebiology +, genetics +, medicine + and neuroscience +
Has individual performance feedbackN/A +
Has infrastructureZooniverse +
Has interface usabilityeasy to use +
Has location of activitiesMRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology +, Cambridge + and UK +
Has main institutionMRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge +
Has member profilesN/A +
Has other data types to manipulatevideos +
Has participant contribution typedata analysis +
Has participant task descriptionWhen you classify on wormwatchlab.org you’re shown a video of a worm wriggling around. The aim of the game is to watch and wait for the worm to lay eggs, and to hit the ‘z’ key when they do. +
Has partner institutionsMedical Research Council (MRC) as part of the Medical Research Council Centenary year programme + and Medical Research Foundation +
Has peer to peer guidanceN/A +
Has project access URLhttp://www.wormwatchlab.org/ +
Has project descriptionWe need the public’s help in observing the
We need the public’s help in observing the behaviour of tiny nematode worms. When you classify on wormwatchlab.org you’re shown a video of a worm wriggling around. The aim of the game is to watch and wait for the worm to lay eggs, and to hit the ‘z’ key when they do.
eggs, and to hit the ‘z’ key when they do. +
Has project nameWorm Watch Lab +
Has project news sitehttp://blog.wormwatchlab.org/ +
Has project news updatesless than weekly +
Has project purposeBy watching these worms lay eggs, you’re helping to collect valuable data about genetics that will assist medical research by helping us understand how the brain works and how genes affect behaviour. +
Has project start dateJune 30, 2013 +
Has research progress feedbackN/A +
Has research questionThe idea is that if a gene is involved in a visible behaviour +, then mutations that break that gene might lead to detectable behavioural changes. The type of change gives us a hint about what the affected gene might be doing. Although it is small and has far fewer cells than we do +, C. elegans has almost as many genes and because we share a common ancestor even with worms +, many of them are closely related to human genes. This presents us with the opportunity to study the function of genes that are important for human brain function in an animal that is easier to handle +, great for microscopy and genetics + and and has a generation time of only a few days. +
Has screenshotScreen Shot 2013-11-15 at 11.51.05.png +
Has social software sitesTwitter + and Facebook +
Has subject areaMedical and health sciences +
Has team linkhttp://www.wormwatchlab.org/#/team +
Has team workN/A +
Has training sequenceN/A +
Has tutorials and documentationN/A +
Has volonteer computingno +
Has volonteer gamingno +
Has volonteer sensingno +
Has volonteer thinkingno +
Is opentrue +
Last editionNovember 15, 2013 +