WhaleFM

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Cs Portal > List of citizen science projects > Whale FM - (2013/10/14)

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WhaleFM Home-2013-10-14.png
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IDENTIFICATION

Participant's homepage
Start date :
  • Beta start date : N/A
  • End date : Still open.
Subject

Description The WhaleFM project ask participants to help classifying calls of Whales, i.e. find close matching pairs of calls.

According to Mariette DiChristina, Whale.FM—a collaborative effort of Scientific American, Zooniverse and the research institutions WHOI, TNO, the University of Oxford and SMRU—lets citizen scientists help marine researchers who are studying what whales are saying. Purpose Different international research projects have been set up to address several of these issues by studying the effect of sound on the behavior of marine mammals. The aim of such ‘behavioral response studies’ is to try to understand how and why marine mammals respond to various sound stimuli. These studies are badly needed in order to establish regulations and guidelines to mitigate the impact of man-made sound on marine life.

Many of the sounds that you will hear in this project have been recorded during such behavioral response studies. In these experiments, the effect of sonar sound on killer whales and pilot whales is studied. What we find is that killer whales and pilot whales respond to sonar sounds amongst others by changing the calls that they make.

The communication of killer whales and pilot whales is still poorly understood. While we know for some species the general context in which sounds are made (reproduction, contact calls for finding each other) many of the calls remain a mystery to us. To properly understand the implications of these responses, we need to know more about why and when animals make specific calls. This process is very challenging especially for vocal species such as killer whales and pilot whales.

Source: Science, retrieved oct. 14 2013 ? Research question According to the Science page, (retrieved oct. 14 2013), the dataset generated by this project will allow us to address interesting questions, such as:

  • How well do different judgements of volunteers agree, and how well can we categorize calls of vocal species such as pilot whales?
  • How large is the call repertoire of pilot whales? (is size repertoire sign of intelligence?)
  • Do the long and short finned pilot whales have different call repertoires (or ‘dialects’?)

TEAM

MAIN TEAM LOCATION
Loading map...

Project team page scientificamerican.com Leader: Peter Tyack, Scientist Emeritus, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Institution: Partner institutions: Contact: Sander von Benda-Beckmann sander.vonbendabeckmann@tno.nl

USER TASKS

CONTRIBUTION TYPE: data interpretation
PARTICIPATION TYPOLOGY:


GAMING GENRE NONE
GAMING ELEMENTS: NONE

COMPUTING
THINKING
SENSING
GAMING

Tasks description Participants have to identify matching calls of Pilot and Killer Whales. They can look at spectograms and also listen to sound. A series of whales were tagged with an audio device that records calls and position. Interaction with objects Participant has to select spectogram pictures, can listen to associated sound and tick if it seems to be matching a given spectogram. A selected item then must be compared again before the user can click "Match".

It is possible to follow the same Whale.

Each call can be discussed in a contextualized forum Interface

  • Data type to manipulate: sound, other
  • interface enjoyment:
  • Interface usability:

GUIDANCE

GUIDANCE
  • Tutorial:
  • Peer to peer guidance: Somewhat
  • Training sequence: Somewhat
FEEDBACK ON
  • Individual performance: Somewhat
  • Collective performance: Somewhat
  • Research progress: Somewhat

Feedback and guidance description It is possible to see the analyzed calls on a map.

COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY TOOLS
  • Communication: forum
  • Social Network: N/A
  • Member profiles:: N/A
  • Member profile elements:
NEWS & EVENTS
  • Main news site: http://talk.whale.fm/
  • Frequency of project news updates: less than weekly
  • Type of events:
  • Frequency of events :

Community description

  • Community size (volounteers based)
  • Role:
  • Interaction form:
  • Has official community manager(s): maybe
  • Has team work N/A
  • Other:
  • Community led additions:


Other information

1 PROJECT

Url:http://whale.fm/
Start date:
End date: Still open
Infrastructure: Zooniverse

2 TEAM

Official team page:scientificamerican.com
Leader: Peter Tyack, Scientist Emeritus, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution


Contact: sander.vonbendabeckmann@tno.nl

3 PROJECT DEFINITION


3.1 Subject

Natural sciences > Oceanography (nature/conservation)

3.2 Description

The WhaleFM project ask participants to help classifying calls of Whales, i.e. find close matching pairs of calls. According to Mariette DiChristina, Whale.FM—a collaborative effort of Scientific American, Zooniverse and the research institutions WHOI, TNO, the University of Oxford and SMRU—lets citizen scientists help marine researchers who are studying what whales are saying.

3.3 Purpose.

Different international research projects have been set up to address several of these issues by studying the effect of sound on the behavior of marine mammals. The aim of such ‘behavioral response studies’ is to try to understand how and why marine mammals respond to various sound stimuli. These studies are badly needed in order to establish regulations and guidelines to mitigate the impact of man-made sound on marine life. Many of the sounds that you will hear in this project have been recorded during such behavioral response studies. In these experiments, the effect of sonar sound on killer whales and pilot whales is studied. What we find is that killer whales and pilot whales respond to sonar sounds amongst others by changing the calls that they make. The communication of killer whales and pilot whales is still poorly understood. While we know for some species the general context in which sounds are made (reproduction, contact calls for finding each other) many of the calls remain a mystery to us. To properly understand the implications of these responses, we need to know more about why and when animals make specific calls. This process is very challenging especially for vocal species such as killer whales and pilot whales. Source: Science, retrieved oct. 14 2013

3.4 Research question.

According to the Science page, (retrieved oct. 14 2013), the dataset generated by this project will allow us to address interesting questions, such as:

  • How well do different judgements of volunteers agree, and how well can we categorize calls of vocal species such as pilot whales?
  • How large is the call repertoire of pilot whales? (is size repertoire sign of intelligence?)
  • Do the long and short finned pilot whales have different call repertoires (or ‘dialects’?)

4 ABOUT PARTICIPANT TASKS


4.1 Tasks description.

Participants have to identify matching calls of Pilot and Killer Whales. They can look at spectograms and also listen to sound. A series of whales were tagged with an audio device that records calls and position.

4.2 Interaction with system objects.

Participant has to select spectogram pictures, can listen to associated sound and tick if it seems to be matching a given spectogram. A selected item then must be compared again before the user can click "Match". It is possible to follow the same Whale. Each call can be discussed in a contextualized forum

Grey typology Participation typology Contribution type:
Computing: NO Thinking: YES
Sensing: NO Gaming: NO
Crowdsourcing Distributed intelligence
Participatory science Extreme citizen science
Science outreach
Data collection
Data analysis
Data interpretation --------
Gaming
Genre: Gaming elements:
Interface
Data type to manipulate: sound, other interface enjoyment:
Interface usability:
Member profiles::N/A
Member profile elements:


5 ABOUT GUIDANCE AND FEEDBACK


Guidance Feedback on
Tutorial and documentation: YES
Training sequence: SOMEWHAT
Peer to peer guidance: SOMEWHAT
individual performance: Somewhat
collective performance: Somewhat
research progress: Somewhat

5.1 Feedback and guidance description.

It is possible to see the analyzed calls on a map.

6 COMMUNITY


Tools News & Events

Communication: forum
Social Network: N/A

Main news site: http://talk.whale.fm/
Frequency of project news updates: less than weekly
Type of events:
Frequency of events :

Community description

Community size (volounteers based):
Role: Interaction form:
Has official community manager(s): maybe
Has team work N/A

Other information about community:
Community led additions:

7 OTHER PROJECT INFORMATION




WhaleFM Home-2013-10-14.png Yes [[has completion level::Low]

scientificamerican.com Sander von Benda-Beckmann

sander.vonbendabeckmann@tno.nl

Yes Oceanography Natural sciences nature/conservation Different international research projects have been set up to address several of these issues by studying the effect of sound on the behavior of marine mammals. The aim of such ‘behavioral response studies’ is to try to understand how and why marine mammals respond to various sound stimuli. These studies are badly needed in order to establish regulations and guidelines to mitigate the impact of man-made sound on marine life.

Many of the sounds that you will hear in this project have been recorded during such behavioral response studies. In these experiments, the effect of sonar sound on killer whales and pilot whales is studied. What we find is that killer whales and pilot whales respond to sonar sounds amongst others by changing the calls that they make.

The communication of killer whales and pilot whales is still poorly understood. While we know for some species the general context in which sounds are made (reproduction, contact calls for finding each other) many of the calls remain a mystery to us. To properly understand the implications of these responses, we need to know more about why and when animals make specific calls. This process is very challenging especially for vocal species such as killer whales and pilot whales.

Source: Science, retrieved oct. 14 2013 According to the Science page, (retrieved oct. 14 2013), the dataset generated by this project will allow us to address interesting questions, such as:

  • How well do different judgements of volunteers agree, and how well can we categorize calls of vocal species such as pilot whales?
  • How large is the call repertoire of pilot whales? (is size repertoire sign of intelligence?)
  • Do the long and short finned pilot whales have different call repertoires (or ‘dialects’?)

Whale FM Participants have to identify matching calls of Pilot and Killer Whales. They can look at spectograms and also listen to sound. A series of whales were tagged with an audio device that records calls and position. data interpretation


sound, other, other: Spectograms Thinking: yes Computing: no Sensing: no Gaming: no


Participant has to select spectogram pictures, can listen to associated sound and tick if it seems to be matching a given spectogram. A selected item then must be compared again before the user can click "Match".

It is possible to follow the same Whale.

Each call can be discussed in a contextualized forum


yes N/A strong somewhat N/A N/A It is possible to see the analyzed calls on a map. N/A

maybe forum N/A


http://talk.whale.fm/

less than weekly


N/A


Low

Other stuff ....


Bibliography

BIBLIOGRAPHY



Whale.FM: Where Citizen Science, Whale Songs and Education Come Together. Mariette DiChristina

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/at-scientific-american/2012/04/19/whale-fm-where-citizen-science-whale-songs-and-education-come-together/
💬   This piece is a recording of a live chat.

Whale.FM: Where Citizen Science, Whale Songs and Education Come Together. Mariette DiChristina

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/at-scientific-american/2012/04/19/whale-fm-where-citizen-science-whale-songs-and-education-come-together/
This piece is a recording of a live chat.


Scientific American launches Citizen Science Whale-Song Project, Whale FM. Scientific American

http://www.scientificamerican.com/pressroom/pr/corporate-press-releases/2011/emscientific-americanem-launches-citizen-science-whale-song-project-whale-fm/
💬   Press Release November 29, 2011

Scientific American launches Citizen Science Whale-Song Project, Whale FM. Scientific American

http://www.scientificamerican.com/pressroom/pr/corporate-press-releases/2011/emscientific-americanem-launches-citizen-science-whale-song-project-whale-fm/
Press Release November 29, 2011


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Facts about "WhaleFM"
Has additional informationThis piece is a recording of a live chat. + and Press Release November 29, 2011 +
Has authorScientific American + and Mariette DiChristina +
Has citizen science subject areanature/conservation +
Has collective performance feedbackN/A +
Has community managermaybe +
Has community toolsForum +
Has completion levelLow +
Has contact personSander von Benda-Beckmann +
Has contact person URLhttp://sander.vonbendabeckmann@tno.nl +
Has data types to manipulatesound + and other +
Has description of feedback and guidanceIt is possible to see the analyzed calls on a map. +
Has field of scienceOceanography +
Has individual performance feedbacksomewhat +
Has infrastructureZooniverse +
Has interaction with objectsParticipant has to select spectogram pictu
Participant has to select spectogram pictures, can listen to associated sound and tick if it seems to be matching a given spectogram. A selected item then must be compared again before the user can click "Match".

It is possible to follow the same Whale.

Each call can be discussed in a contextualized forum
can be discussed in a contextualized forum +
Has linkhttp://www.scientificamerican.com/citizen-science/project.cfm?id=the-whale-song-project-whale-fm +, http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/at-scientific-american/2012/04/19/whale-fm-where-citizen-science-whale-songs-and-education-come-together/ + and http://www.scientificamerican.com/pressroom/pr/corporate-press-releases/2011/emscientific-americanem-launches-citizen-science-whale-song-project-whale-fm/ +
Has member profilesN/A +
Has other data types to manipulateSpectograms +
Has participant contribution typedata interpretation +
Has participant task descriptionParticipants have to identify matching calls of Pilot and Killer Whales. They can look at spectograms and also listen to sound. A series of whales were tagged with an audio device that records calls and position. +
Has peer to peer guidanceN/A +
Has project access URLhttp://whale.fm/ +
Has project descriptionThe WhaleFM project ask participants to he
The WhaleFM project ask participants to help classifying calls of Whales, i.e. find close matching pairs of calls. According to Mariette DiChristina, Whale.FM—a collaborative effort of Scientific American, Zooniverse and the research institutions WHOI, TNO, the University of Oxford and SMRU—lets citizen scientists help marine researchers who are studying what whales are saying.
s who are studying what whales are saying. +
Has project nameWhale FM +
Has project news sitehttp://talk.whale.fm/ +
Has project news updatesless than weekly +
Has project purposeDifferent international research projects
Different international research projects have been set up to address several of these issues by studying the effect of sound on the behavior of marine mammals. The aim of such ‘behavioral response studies’ is to try to understand how and why marine mammals respond to various sound stimuli. These studies are badly needed in order to establish regulations and guidelines to mitigate the impact of man-made sound on marine life.

Many of the sounds that you will hear in this project have been recorded during such behavioral response studies. In these experiments, the effect of sonar sound on killer whales and pilot whales is studied. What we find is that killer whales and pilot whales respond to sonar sounds amongst others by changing the calls that they make.

The communication of killer whales and pilot whales is still poorly understood. While we know for some species the general context in which sounds are made (reproduction, contact calls for finding each other) many of the calls remain a mystery to us. To properly understand the implications of these responses, we need to know more about why and when animals make specific calls. This process is very challenging especially for vocal species such as killer whales and pilot whales.

Source: Science, retrieved oct. 14 2013
m/science Science], retrieved oct. 14 2013 +
Has publication typeBlog + and other +
Has research progress feedbackN/A +
Has research questionAccording to the Science page +, (retrieved oct. 14 2013) +, the dataset generated by this project will allow us to address interesting questions +, such as:
  • How well do different judgements of volunteers agree + and and how well can we categorize calls of vo
    and how well can we categorize calls of vocal species such as pilot whales?
  • How large is the call repertoire of pilot whales? (is size repertoire sign of intelligence?)
  • Do the long and short finned pilot whales have different call repertoires (or ‘dialects’?)ifferent call repertoires (or ‘dialects’?) +
Has screenshotWhaleFM Home-2013-10-14.png +
Has social software sitesN/A +
Has subject areaNatural sciences +
Has team leaderPeter Tyack, Scientist Emeritus, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution +
Has team linkhttp://scientificamerican.com +
Has team workN/A +
Has titleThe Whale Song Project (Whale FM) +, Whale.FM: Where Citizen Science, Whale Songs and Education Come Together + and Scientific American launches Citizen Science Whale-Song Project, Whale FM +
Has training sequencestrong +
Has tutorials and documentationyes +
Has volonteer computingno +
Has volonteer gamingno +
Has volonteer sensingno +
Has volonteer thinkingyes +
Is opentrue +
Last editionOctober 14, 2013 +