Space Warps

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Cs Portal > List of citizen science projects > Space Warps - (2013/11/14)

Capture d’écran 2013-11-14 à 15.03.54.png
Capture d’écran 2013-11-14 à 15.03.54.png
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IDENTIFICATION

Participant's homepage
  • Infrastructure:
  • Developed with:
Start date :
  • Beta start date : N/A
  • End date : Still open.
Subject

Description Massive galaxies warp space-time around themselves, bending light rays so that we can see around them. They're the Universe's own telescopes, but these gravitational lenses are very rare: we need your help to find them! Purpose Human beings have a remarkable ability to recognise patterns and detect the unusual with only minimal training. With a basic understanding of what the distorted images of galaxies that have passed through a gravitational lens look like, participants in the SpaceWarps project can help discover new examples of this amazing phenomenon, and enable our survey scientists to carry out new investigations of stars and dark matter in the universe. We will be doing two types of lens search. In our blind searches, we’ll be asking volunteers to spot signs of gravitational lensing in images of the sky taken as part of the CFHT (Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope) legacy survey. This survey has been searched by computers, but we’re pretty sure they didn’t catch all the lenses to be found! These results will help us re-train the computers to do better on larger surveys in future. Then, in our targeted searches, in other upcoming sky surveys, we’ll be showing participants galaxies and groups of galaxies that our computers have selected as possibly being gravitational lenses. The task will then be to assess whether or not they actually are! In both cases, there will be confusing objects around - the challenge is to come up with the most plausible explanation for what is going on, in collaboration with the rest of the SpaceWarps community. Do you think you can spot outer space being warped? We do! ? Research question Einstein's theory of gravity, General Relativity, made a remarkable prediction. Massive objects, such as stars, would bend the space around them such that passing light rays follow curved paths. Evidence for this revolutionary theory was first obtained by Arthur Eddington in 1919, when during a solar eclipse he observed that stars near the edge of the Sun appeared to be slightly out of position. The Sun was behaving like the lens in a magnifying glass and bending the light from the background stars!

In 1937, Fritz Zwicky realized that massive galaxies (which can contain anywhere from ten million to a hundred trillion stars) or clusters of galaxies could be used to magnify distant galaxies that conventional telescopes couldn’t detect. As you can see, not unlike a conventional magnifying glass, these gravitational lenses not only magnify and focus the light of the distant background galaxies but they can, and mostly do, distort them as well.

When one of these gravitational lenses happens to sit right in front of a background galaxy, the magnification factor can be up to x10 or even more, giving us a zoomed-in view of the distant universe, just at that particular point. Lenses can help us investigate young galaxies more than halfway across the universe, as they formed stars and started to take on the familiar shapes we see nearby.

Observations of the distorted background galaxy can also give us useful information about the object that is behaving as a gravitational lens. The separation and distortion of the lensed images can tell astronomers how much mass there is in the object, and how it is arranged. It’s one of the few ways we have of mapping out where the dark matter in the universe is, how clumpy it is and how dense it is near the centers of galaxies. Knowing this can provide crucial information about how galaxies evolve.

TEAM

MAIN TEAM LOCATION
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University of Oxford

Project team page http://spacewarps.org/#/about Leader: Phil Marshall Institution: University of Oxford Physics Partner institutions: Contact: http://talk.spacewarps.org/

USER TASKS

CONTRIBUTION TYPE: data analysis, data interpretation
PARTICIPATION TYPOLOGY:


GAMING GENRE NONE
GAMING ELEMENTS: NONE

COMPUTING
THINKING
SENSING
GAMING

Tasks description Mark gravitational lenses Interaction with objects Mark gravitational lenses on photos. Interface

  • Data type to manipulate: pictures
  • interface enjoyment: cool/attractive
  • Interface usability: easy to use

GUIDANCE

GUIDANCE
  • Tutorial:
  • Peer to peer guidance: Somewhat
  • Training sequence: Somewhat
FEEDBACK ON
  • Individual performance:
  • Collective performance: Somewhat
  • Research progress: Somewhat

Feedback and guidance description

COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY TOOLS
  • Communication: website, blog, forum
  • Social Network: N/A
  • Member profiles:: minimal
  • Member profile elements:
NEWS & EVENTS
  • Main news site:
  • Frequency of project news updates: N/A
  • Type of events:
  • Frequency of events :

Community description

  • Community size (volounteers based)
  • Role:
  • Interaction form:
  • Has official community manager(s): N/A
  • Has team work N/A
  • Other:
  • Community led additions:


Other information

1 PROJECT

Url:http://spacewarps.org/
Start date:
End date: Still open


2 TEAM

Official team page:http://spacewarps.org/#/about
Leader: Phil Marshall
Institution: University of Oxford Physics

Contact: http://talk.spacewarps.org/
Main location: University of Oxford

3 PROJECT DEFINITION


3.1 Subject

Natural sciences > astronomy, astrophysics (space)

3.2 Description

Massive galaxies warp space-time around themselves, bending light rays so that we can see around them. They're the Universe's own telescopes, but these gravitational lenses are very rare: we need your help to find them!

3.3 Purpose.

Human beings have a remarkable ability to recognise patterns and detect the unusual with only minimal training. With a basic understanding of what the distorted images of galaxies that have passed through a gravitational lens look like, participants in the SpaceWarps project can help discover new examples of this amazing phenomenon, and enable our survey scientists to carry out new investigations of stars and dark matter in the universe. We will be doing two types of lens search. In our blind searches, we’ll be asking volunteers to spot signs of gravitational lensing in images of the sky taken as part of the CFHT (Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope) legacy survey. This survey has been searched by computers, but we’re pretty sure they didn’t catch all the lenses to be found! These results will help us re-train the computers to do better on larger surveys in future. Then, in our targeted searches, in other upcoming sky surveys, we’ll be showing participants galaxies and groups of galaxies that our computers have selected as possibly being gravitational lenses. The task will then be to assess whether or not they actually are! In both cases, there will be confusing objects around - the challenge is to come up with the most plausible explanation for what is going on, in collaboration with the rest of the SpaceWarps community. Do you think you can spot outer space being warped? We do!

3.4 Research question.

Einstein's theory of gravity, General Relativity, made a remarkable prediction. Massive objects, such as stars, would bend the space around them such that passing light rays follow curved paths. Evidence for this revolutionary theory was first obtained by Arthur Eddington in 1919, when during a solar eclipse he observed that stars near the edge of the Sun appeared to be slightly out of position. The Sun was behaving like the lens in a magnifying glass and bending the light from the background stars! In 1937, Fritz Zwicky realized that massive galaxies (which can contain anywhere from ten million to a hundred trillion stars) or clusters of galaxies could be used to magnify distant galaxies that conventional telescopes couldn’t detect. As you can see, not unlike a conventional magnifying glass, these gravitational lenses not only magnify and focus the light of the distant background galaxies but they can, and mostly do, distort them as well. When one of these gravitational lenses happens to sit right in front of a background galaxy, the magnification factor can be up to x10 or even more, giving us a zoomed-in view of the distant universe, just at that particular point. Lenses can help us investigate young galaxies more than halfway across the universe, as they formed stars and started to take on the familiar shapes we see nearby. Observations of the distorted background galaxy can also give us useful information about the object that is behaving as a gravitational lens. The separation and distortion of the lensed images can tell astronomers how much mass there is in the object, and how it is arranged. It’s one of the few ways we have of mapping out where the dark matter in the universe is, how clumpy it is and how dense it is near the centers of galaxies. Knowing this can provide crucial information about how galaxies evolve.

4 ABOUT PARTICIPANT TASKS


4.1 Tasks description.

Mark gravitational lenses

4.2 Interaction with system objects.

Mark gravitational lenses on photos.

Grey typology Participation typology Contribution type:
Computing: NO Thinking: NO
Sensing: NO Gaming: NO
Crowdsourcing Distributed intelligence
Participatory science Extreme citizen science
Science outreach
Data collection
Data analysis
Data interpretation --------
Gaming
Genre: Gaming elements:
Interface
Data type to manipulate: pictures interface enjoyment: cool/attractive
Interface usability: easy to use
Member profiles::minimal
Member profile elements:


5 ABOUT GUIDANCE AND FEEDBACK


Guidance Feedback on
Tutorial and documentation: YES
Training sequence: SOMEWHAT
Peer to peer guidance: SOMEWHAT
individual performance: YES
collective performance: Somewhat
research progress: Somewhat

5.1 .

6 COMMUNITY


Tools News & Events

Communication: website, blog, forum
Social Network: N/A

Main news site:
Frequency of project news updates: N/A
Type of events:
Frequency of events :

Community description

Community size (volounteers based):
Role: Interaction form:
Has official community manager(s): N/A
Has team work N/A

Other information about community:
Community led additions:

7 OTHER PROJECT INFORMATION




Capture d’écran 2013-11-14 à 15.03.54.png Yes [[has completion level::Low]

http://spacewarps.org/#/about

University of Oxford http://talk.spacewarps.org/

Yes astronomy, astrophysics Natural sciences space Human beings have a remarkable ability to recognise patterns and detect the unusual with only minimal training. With a basic understanding of what the distorted images of galaxies that have passed through a gravitational lens look like, participants in the SpaceWarps project can help discover new examples of this amazing phenomenon, and enable our survey scientists to carry out new investigations of stars and dark matter in the universe. We will be doing two types of lens search. In our blind searches, we’ll be asking volunteers to spot signs of gravitational lensing in images of the sky taken as part of the CFHT (Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope) legacy survey. This survey has been searched by computers, but we’re pretty sure they didn’t catch all the lenses to be found! These results will help us re-train the computers to do better on larger surveys in future. Then, in our targeted searches, in other upcoming sky surveys, we’ll be showing participants galaxies and groups of galaxies that our computers have selected as possibly being gravitational lenses. The task will then be to assess whether or not they actually are! In both cases, there will be confusing objects around - the challenge is to come up with the most plausible explanation for what is going on, in collaboration with the rest of the SpaceWarps community. Do you think you can spot outer space being warped? We do! Einstein's theory of gravity, General Relativity, made a remarkable prediction. Massive objects, such as stars, would bend the space around them such that passing light rays follow curved paths. Evidence for this revolutionary theory was first obtained by Arthur Eddington in 1919, when during a solar eclipse he observed that stars near the edge of the Sun appeared to be slightly out of position. The Sun was behaving like the lens in a magnifying glass and bending the light from the background stars!

In 1937, Fritz Zwicky realized that massive galaxies (which can contain anywhere from ten million to a hundred trillion stars) or clusters of galaxies could be used to magnify distant galaxies that conventional telescopes couldn’t detect. As you can see, not unlike a conventional magnifying glass, these gravitational lenses not only magnify and focus the light of the distant background galaxies but they can, and mostly do, distort them as well.

When one of these gravitational lenses happens to sit right in front of a background galaxy, the magnification factor can be up to x10 or even more, giving us a zoomed-in view of the distant universe, just at that particular point. Lenses can help us investigate young galaxies more than halfway across the universe, as they formed stars and started to take on the familiar shapes we see nearby.

Observations of the distorted background galaxy can also give us useful information about the object that is behaving as a gravitational lens. The separation and distortion of the lensed images can tell astronomers how much mass there is in the object, and how it is arranged. It’s one of the few ways we have of mapping out where the dark matter in the universe is, how clumpy it is and how dense it is near the centers of galaxies. Knowing this can provide crucial information about how galaxies evolve.

Space Warps Mark gravitational lenses data analysis, data interpretation


pictures, other: Thinking: no Computing: no Sensing: no Gaming: no


Mark gravitational lenses on photos. cool/attractive easy to use yes N/A weak yes N/A N/A

minimal

N/A website, blog, forum N/A



N/A


N/A


Low



Bibliography

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Facts about "Space Warps"
Has addressUniversity of Oxford +
Has citizen science subject areaspace +
Has collective performance feedbackN/A +
Has community managerN/A +
Has community toolsWebsite +, Blog + and Forum +
Has completion levelLow +
Has contact person URLhttp://talk.spacewarps.org/ +
Has data types to manipulatepictures +
Has field of scienceastronomy + and astrophysics +
Has individual performance feedbackyes +
Has interaction with objectsMark gravitational lenses on photos. +
Has interface attractivitycool/attractive +
Has interface usabilityeasy to use +
Has main institutionUniversity of Oxford Physics +
Has member profilesminimal +
Has participant contribution typedata analysis + and data interpretation +
Has participant task descriptionMark gravitational lenses +
Has peer to peer guidanceN/A +
Has project access URLhttp://spacewarps.org/ +
Has project descriptionMassive galaxies warp space-time around themselves, bending light rays so that we can see around them. They're the Universe's own telescopes, but these gravitational lenses are very rare: we need your help to find them! +
Has project nameSpace Warps +
Has project news updatesN/A +
Has project purposeHuman beings have a remarkable ability to
Human beings have a remarkable ability to recognise patterns and detect the unusual with only minimal training. With a basic understanding of what the distorted images of galaxies that have passed through a gravitational lens look like, participants in the SpaceWarps project can help discover new examples of this amazing phenomenon, and enable our survey scientists to carry out new investigations of stars and dark matter in the universe. We will be doing two types of lens search. In our blind searches, we’ll be asking volunteers to spot signs of gravitational lensing in images of the sky taken as part of the CFHT (Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope) legacy survey. This survey has been searched by computers, but we’re pretty sure they didn’t catch all the lenses to be found! These results will help us re-train the computers to do better on larger surveys in future. Then, in our targeted searches, in other upcoming sky surveys, we’ll be showing participants galaxies and groups of galaxies that our computers have selected as possibly being gravitational lenses. The task will then be to assess whether or not they actually are! In both cases, there will be confusing objects around - the challenge is to come up with the most plausible explanation for what is going on, in collaboration with the rest of the SpaceWarps community. Do you think you can spot outer space being warped? We do!
can spot outer space being warped? We do! +
Has research progress feedbackN/A +
Has research questionEinstein's theory of gravity +, General Relativity +, made a remarkable prediction. Massive objects +, such as stars +, would bend the space around them such that passing light rays follow curved paths. Evidence for this revolutionary theory was first obtained by Arthur Eddington in 1919 +, when during a solar eclipse he observed that stars near the edge of the Sun appeared to be slightly out of position. The Sun was behaving like the lens in a magnifying glass and bending the light from the background stars!

In 1937 +, Fritz Zwicky realized that massive galaxies (which can contain anywhere from ten million to a hundred trillion stars) or clusters of galaxies could be used to magnify distant galaxies that conventional telescopes couldn’t detect. As you can see +, not unlike a conventional magnifying glass +, these gravitational lenses not only magnify and focus the light of the distant background galaxies but they can +, and mostly do +, distort them as well.

When one of these gravitational lenses happens to sit right in front of a background galaxy +, the magnification factor can be up to x10 or even more +, giving us a zoomed-in view of the distant universe +, just at that particular point. Lenses can help us investigate young galaxies more than halfway across the universe +, as they formed stars and started to take o
as they formed stars and started to take on the familiar shapes we see nearby. Observations of the distorted background galaxy can also give us useful information about the object that is behaving as a gravitational lens. The separation and distortion of the lensed images can tell astronomers how much mass there is in the object
omers how much mass there is in the object +, and how it is arranged. It’s one of the few ways we have of mapping out where the dark matter in the universe is + and how clumpy it is and how dense it is near the centers of galaxies. Knowing this can provide crucial information about how galaxies evolve. +
Has screenshotCapture d’écran 2013-11-14 à 15.03.54.png +
Has social software sitesN/A +
Has subject areaNatural sciences +
Has team leaderPhil Marshall +
Has team linkhttp://spacewarps.org/#/about +
Has team workN/A +
Has training sequenceweak +
Has tutorials and documentationyes +
Has volonteer computingno +
Has volonteer gamingno +
Has volonteer sensingno +
Has volonteer thinkingno +
Is opentrue +
Last editionNovember 14, 2013 +