Solar Stormwatch

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Cs Portal > List of citizen science projects > Solar Stormwatch - (2013/11/14)

Capture d’écran 2013-11-14 à 14.43.41.png
Capture d’écran 2013-11-14 à 14.43.41.png
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CCLlogo.png


IDENTIFICATION

Participant's homepage
Start date :
  • Beta start date : N/A
  • End date :
Subject

Description Explore interactive diagrams to learn about the Sun and the spacecraft monitoring it. The STEREO spacecraft is scientists’ latest mission to study the Sun and space weather – not clouds and rain, but how solar storms change conditions in space and on Earth. Purpose The reason that we want lots of people doing this is because that takes away the subjectivity. If we have a consensus view of what a CME looks like and which way it's going then you can be much more confident about that answer being correct. ? Research question The STEREO Mission itself has several big questions that it’s trying to answer. We know that the Sun kicks out these vast solar storms. Each one of these storms is a billion tons of material traveling at a million miles an hour, so they’re not inconsequential. But nobody quite knows why they happen, what causes them to be triggered. For the first time with STEREO, we are actually being able to track these storms continuously all the way from the Sun right out to the Earth from a position which is not near the Earth. So we are actually able to stand back and look at the storm coming from a distance. We want to really start building a space weather forecast from this. Just studying one event doesn't tell you very much about the Sun's behavior in general. What we want to know about is, okay, we understand maybe in detail one event, but what does it do for the next 200 times? Is it the same? Does it change? Does it get progressively more active as the sun gets active? Do they get progressively weaker? Do they get faster? Do they get slower? Do they go off in a particular direction? All these questions need you to have lots of numbers, and we need as many numbers as we possibly can.

TEAM

MAIN TEAM LOCATION
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Royal Observatory Greenwich

Project team page http://www.solarstormwatch.com/mission_briefing Leader: Chris Davis Institution: STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Partner institutions: Royal Observatory Greenwich, Zooniverse Contact: http://www.solarstormwatch.com/talk_about_it

USER TASKS

CONTRIBUTION TYPE: data analysis, data interpretation
PARTICIPATION TYPOLOGY:


GAMING GENRE NONE
GAMING ELEMENTS: NONE

COMPUTING
THINKING
SENSING
GAMING

Tasks description

Interaction with objects Play video, mark beginning and ending of storms, mark extent of storm across camera. Interface

  • Data type to manipulate: pictures
  • interface enjoyment: somewhat cool/attractive
  • Interface usability: rather easy to use

GUIDANCE

GUIDANCE
  • Tutorial:
  • Peer to peer guidance: x
  • Training sequence: x
FEEDBACK ON
  • Individual performance:
  • Collective performance: Somewhat
  • Research progress: Somewhat

Feedback and guidance description

COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY TOOLS
  • Communication: blog, forum
  • Social Network: Twitter, other
  • Member profiles:: minimal
  • Member profile elements:
NEWS & EVENTS
  • Main news site:
  • Frequency of project news updates: N/A
  • Type of events:
  • Frequency of events :

Community description

  • Community size (volounteers based)
  • Role:
  • Interaction form:
  • Has official community manager(s): N/A
  • Has team work N/A
  • Other:
  • Community led additions:


Other information

1 PROJECT

Url:http://www.solarstormwatch.com/
Start date:
End date:
Infrastructure: Zooniverse

2 TEAM

Official team page:http://www.solarstormwatch.com/mission_briefing
Leader: Chris Davis
Institution: STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory
Partner institutions: Royal Observatory Greenwich, Zooniverse
Contact: http://www.solarstormwatch.com/talk_about_it
Main location: Royal Observatory Greenwich

3 PROJECT DEFINITION


3.1 Subject

Natural sciences > astronomy, astrophyics (space)

3.2 Description

Explore interactive diagrams to learn about the Sun and the spacecraft monitoring it. The STEREO spacecraft is scientists’ latest mission to study the Sun and space weather – not clouds and rain, but how solar storms change conditions in space and on Earth.

3.3 Purpose.

The reason that we want lots of people doing this is because that takes away the subjectivity. If we have a consensus view of what a CME looks like and which way it's going then you can be much more confident about that answer being correct.

3.4 Research question.

The STEREO Mission itself has several big questions that it’s trying to answer. We know that the Sun kicks out these vast solar storms. Each one of these storms is a billion tons of material traveling at a million miles an hour, so they’re not inconsequential. But nobody quite knows why they happen, what causes them to be triggered. For the first time with STEREO, we are actually being able to track these storms continuously all the way from the Sun right out to the Earth from a position which is not near the Earth. So we are actually able to stand back and look at the storm coming from a distance. We want to really start building a space weather forecast from this. Just studying one event doesn't tell you very much about the Sun's behavior in general. What we want to know about is, okay, we understand maybe in detail one event, but what does it do for the next 200 times? Is it the same? Does it change? Does it get progressively more active as the sun gets active? Do they get progressively weaker? Do they get faster? Do they get slower? Do they go off in a particular direction? All these questions need you to have lots of numbers, and we need as many numbers as we possibly can.

4 ABOUT PARTICIPANT TASKS


4.1 .

4.2 Interaction with system objects.

Play video, mark beginning and ending of storms, mark extent of storm across camera.

Grey typology Participation typology Contribution type:
Computing: NO Thinking: NO
Sensing: NO Gaming: NO
Crowdsourcing Distributed intelligence
Participatory science Extreme citizen science
Science outreach
Data collection
Data analysis
Data interpretation --------
Gaming
Genre: Gaming elements: achievements, reward batches
Interface
Data type to manipulate: pictures interface enjoyment: somewhat cool/attractive
Interface usability: rather easy to use
Member profiles::minimal
Member profile elements:


5 ABOUT GUIDANCE AND FEEDBACK


Guidance Feedback on
Tutorial and documentation: YES
Training sequence: NO
Peer to peer guidance: NO
individual performance: YES
collective performance: Somewhat
research progress: Somewhat

5.1 .

6 COMMUNITY


Tools News & Events

Communication: blog, forum
Social Network: Twitter, other

Main news site:
Frequency of project news updates: N/A
Type of events:
Frequency of events :

Community description

Community size (volounteers based):
Role: Interaction form:
Has official community manager(s): N/A
Has team work N/A

Other information about community:
Community led additions:

7 OTHER PROJECT INFORMATION




Capture d’écran 2013-11-14 à 14.43.41.png No

http://www.solarstormwatch.com/mission_briefing

Royal Observatory Greenwich http://www.solarstormwatch.com/talk_about_it

No astronomy, astrophyics Natural sciences space The reason that we want lots of people doing this is because that takes away the subjectivity. If we have a consensus view of what a CME looks like and which way it's going then you can be much more confident about that answer being correct. The STEREO Mission itself has several big questions that it’s trying to answer. We know that the Sun kicks out these vast solar storms. Each one of these storms is a billion tons of material traveling at a million miles an hour, so they’re not inconsequential. But nobody quite knows why they happen, what causes them to be triggered. For the first time with STEREO, we are actually being able to track these storms continuously all the way from the Sun right out to the Earth from a position which is not near the Earth. So we are actually able to stand back and look at the storm coming from a distance. We want to really start building a space weather forecast from this. Just studying one event doesn't tell you very much about the Sun's behavior in general. What we want to know about is, okay, we understand maybe in detail one event, but what does it do for the next 200 times? Is it the same? Does it change? Does it get progressively more active as the sun gets active? Do they get progressively weaker? Do they get faster? Do they get slower? Do they go off in a particular direction? All these questions need you to have lots of numbers, and we need as many numbers as we possibly can.

Solar Stormwatch

data analysis, data interpretation


pictures, other: Thinking: no Computing: no Sensing: no Gaming: no achievements, reward batches

Play video, mark beginning and ending of storms, mark extent of storm across camera. somewhat cool/attractive rather easy to use yes no no yes N/A N/A

minimal

N/A blog, forum Twitter, other



N/A


N/A




Bibliography

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Facts about "Solar Stormwatch"
Has addressRoyal Observatory Greenwich +
Has citizen science subject areaspace +
Has collective performance feedbackN/A +
Has community managerN/A +
Has community toolsBlog + and Forum +
Has contact person URLhttp://www.solarstormwatch.com/talk_about_it +
Has data types to manipulatepictures +
Has field of scienceastronomy + and astrophyics +
Has gaming elementsachievements + and reward batches +
Has individual performance feedbackyes +
Has infrastructureZooniverse +
Has interaction with objectsPlay video, mark beginning and ending of storms, mark extent of storm across camera. +
Has interface attractivitysomewhat cool/attractive +
Has interface usabilityrather easy to use +
Has main institutionSTFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory +
Has member profilesminimal +
Has participant contribution typedata analysis + and data interpretation +
Has partner institutionsRoyal Observatory Greenwich + and Zooniverse +
Has peer to peer guidanceno +
Has project access URLhttp://www.solarstormwatch.com/ +
Has project descriptionExplore interactive diagrams to learn abou
Explore interactive diagrams to learn about the Sun and the spacecraft monitoring it. The STEREO spacecraft is scientists’ latest mission to study the Sun and space weather – not clouds and rain, but how solar storms change conditions in space and on Earth.
s change conditions in space and on Earth. +
Has project nameSolar Stormwatch +
Has project news updatesN/A +
Has project purposeThe reason that we want lots of people doing this is because that takes away the subjectivity. If we have a consensus view of what a CME looks like and which way it's going then you can be much more confident about that answer being correct. +
Has research progress feedbackN/A +
Has research questionThe STEREO Mission itself has several big questions that it’s trying to answer. We know that the Sun kicks out these vast solar storms. Each one of these storms is a billion tons of material traveling at a million miles an hour +, so they’re not inconsequential. But nobody quite knows why they happen +, what causes them to be triggered. For the first time with STEREO +, we are actually being able to track these
we are actually being able to track these storms continuously all the way from the Sun right out to the Earth from a position which is not near the Earth. So we are actually able to stand back and look at the storm coming from a distance. We want to really start building a space weather forecast from this. Just studying one event doesn't tell you very much about the Sun's behavior in general. What we want to know about is
in general. What we want to know about is +, okay +, we understand maybe in detail one event +, but what does it do for the next 200 times
but what does it do for the next 200 times? Is it the same? Does it change? Does it get progressively more active as the sun gets active? Do they get progressively weaker? Do they get faster? Do they get slower? Do they go off in a particular direction? All these questions need you to have lots of numbers
questions need you to have lots of numbers + and and we need as many numbers as we possibly can. +
Has screenshotCapture d’écran 2013-11-14 à 14.43.41.png +
Has social software sitesTwitter + and other +
Has subject areaNatural sciences +
Has team leaderChris Davis +
Has team linkhttp://www.solarstormwatch.com/mission_briefing +
Has team workN/A +
Has training sequenceno +
Has tutorials and documentationyes +
Has volonteer computingno +
Has volonteer gamingno +
Has volonteer sensingno +
Has volonteer thinkingno +
Is openfalse +
Last editionNovember 14, 2013 +