Phoebe pedagogic planner

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Draft

1 Definition

“Phoebe is a web application designed to provide inspiration and practical support for learning design.” (phoebe application home page, retrieved 15:20, 29 January 2009 (UTC)

Looking at the phoebe welcome screen, it currently (jan 2009) has four functionalities:

  1. Create or modify your learning designs: Build your own design or adapt an existing design.
  2. View shared learning designs: Let Phoebe’s collection of shared designs inspire you.
  3. Browse Phoebe’s teaching and technology guidance: Find out about different tools and the learning activities they support.
  4. Manage your design templates: Create and modify the templates from which you build your learning designs.

2 Context

Phoebe has been developed by a team from the Technology-Assisted Lifelong Learning unit (TALL) at Oxford University and Oxford University Computing Services (OUCS) in partnership with Learning Technologies Group, and with funding from the JISC Design for Learning programme.

  • Marion Manton: Project manager
  • David Balch: Web developer
  • Liz Masterman: researcher & evaluation specialist

3 Software

  • Phoebe can be used through the online Phoebe Beta system
  • It also can be installed on your server (PHP/MySQL). Code is available through tarballs or through a subversion system.

4 Links

5 Bibliography

  • Masterman, Liz,(2008). Jisc Design For Learning Programme, Phoebe Pedagogy Planner Project, Evaluation Report, Version 1.1. Available online: Evaluation report/PDF

Acknowledgement: This article or part of this article has been written during a collaboration with the EducTice group of INRP, which attributed a visiting grant to DKS in january 2009.