Andromeda Project

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Cs Portal > List of citizen science projects > Andromeda Project - (2013/12/20)

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IDENTIFICATION

Participant's homepage
Start date : 2012/12/04
  • Beta start date : N/A
  • End date : The project was closed on 2013/12/05
Subject

Description The Andromeda galaxy is the closest spiral galaxy to our own Milky Way. Using PHAT data from the Hubble Space Telescope we're hunting for star clusters in Andromeda and hidden galaxies that lie behind. Purpose Star clusters are collections of hundreds to millions of stars that were born at the same time from the same cloud of gas. This shared origin makes star clusters unique tools for understanding how stars form and evolve. Additionally, they are useful for studying the major chapters in the history of galaxies. But before Andromeda's star clusters can unlock these secrets, we need the help of Citizen Scientists to find the clusters. Not just the big bright ones, but the small faint ones as well. This is the goal of the Andromeda Project. ? Research question Star clusters vary greatly in terms of mass, size, age, and local environment. As a result, star clusters can appear quite different from one another depending on the properties of the clusters and where they are located in the galaxy. This makes the process of identifying clusters tricky and difficult to automate. From the first year of PHAT data, a team of eight astronomers searched through each image, manually identifying star clusters by eye. Using less than 1/5th the total PHAT survey area, we cataloged about 600 star clusters (Johnson+ 2012). With the Andromeda Project, we hope that you will help us find the thousands of star clusters hiding in the rest of the survey!

Because the appearances of star clusters vary so much, it is important for us to learn what kinds of clusters we can actually see. For this reason, we have inserted realistic synthetic clusters with known ages, masses, and sizes into some of the PHAT images. By identifying both real and synthetic clusters, we will learn what types of clusters are undetectable in Andromeda. This information is critical for understanding the age and mass distributions of the clusters by allowing us to determine whether certain populations of clusters do not exist or if they are simply avoiding detection.

After you help us to find these star clusters, we will use several techniques to determine the age and mass of these objects. In some clusters, we can resolve individual stars that allow us to determine the age, mass, and other aspects of the object. In other clusters, where individual stars are too faint or too close together, we can use the summed light from a cluster to determine its properties (Fouesneau+ 2012, in prep.). With these ages and masses in hand, we can use these clusters to study a host of interesting topics: rapid and rare stages of stellar evolution, the structure and scale of star formation, the evolution of cluster populations, and how Andromeda has changed over billions of years.

TEAM

MAIN TEAM LOCATION
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University of Washington

Project team page http://www.andromedaproject.org/#!/about/people/science-team Leader: Julianne Dalcanton Institution: University of Washington Partner institutions: Adler Planetarium, GLObal Robotic-telescopes Intelligent Array, Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury, Hubble, Zooniverse Contact: Not explicitely specified http://talk.andromedaproject.org/ or https://twitter.com/andromedaproj

USER TASKS

CONTRIBUTION TYPE: data analysis, data interpretation
PARTICIPATION TYPOLOGY: distributed intelligence


GAMING GENRE Puzzle
GAMING ELEMENTS: NONE

COMPUTING
THINKING
SENSING
GAMING

Tasks description Mark interesting features with circles and crosses. Interaction with objects Users must identify star clusters in photographs taken of the Andromeda galaxy. Interface

  • Data type to manipulate: pictures
  • interface enjoyment: somewhat cool/attractive
  • Interface usability: somewhat difficult to use

GUIDANCE

GUIDANCE
  • Tutorial: Somewhat
  • Peer to peer guidance: x
  • Training sequence: x
FEEDBACK ON
  • Individual performance: Somewhat
  • Collective performance:
  • Research progress: Somewhat

Feedback and guidance description

COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY TOOLS
  • Communication: website, blog, forum, chat
  • Social Network: Twitter, Facebook
  • Member profiles:: minimal
  • Member profile elements: other
NEWS & EVENTS

Community description

  • Community size (volounteers based)
  • Role: Forum participation and community problem solving/discussion
  • Interaction form: Forum chat
  • Has official community manager(s): maybe
  • Has team work no
  • Other:
  • Community led additions: 2013/12/05


Other information

1 PROJECT

Url:https://www.zooniverse.org/project/andromedaproject
Start date: 2012/12/04
End date: 2013/12/05
Infrastructure: Zooniverse

2 TEAM

Official team page:http://www.andromedaproject.org/#!/about/people/science-team
Leader: Julianne Dalcanton
Institution: University of Washington
Partner institutions: Adler Planetarium, GLObal Robotic-telescopes Intelligent Array, Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury, Hubble, Zooniverse
Contact: http://talk.andromedaproject.org/ or https://twitter.com/andromedaproj
Main location: University of Washington

3 PROJECT DEFINITION


3.1 Subject

Natural sciences > astronomy, astrophysics (space)

3.2 Description

The Andromeda galaxy is the closest spiral galaxy to our own Milky Way. Using PHAT data from the Hubble Space Telescope we're hunting for star clusters in Andromeda and hidden galaxies that lie behind.

3.3 Purpose.

Star clusters are collections of hundreds to millions of stars that were born at the same time from the same cloud of gas. This shared origin makes star clusters unique tools for understanding how stars form and evolve. Additionally, they are useful for studying the major chapters in the history of galaxies. But before Andromeda's star clusters can unlock these secrets, we need the help of Citizen Scientists to find the clusters. Not just the big bright ones, but the small faint ones as well. This is the goal of the Andromeda Project.

3.4 Research question.

Star clusters vary greatly in terms of mass, size, age, and local environment. As a result, star clusters can appear quite different from one another depending on the properties of the clusters and where they are located in the galaxy. This makes the process of identifying clusters tricky and difficult to automate. From the first year of PHAT data, a team of eight astronomers searched through each image, manually identifying star clusters by eye. Using less than 1/5th the total PHAT survey area, we cataloged about 600 star clusters (Johnson+ 2012). With the Andromeda Project, we hope that you will help us find the thousands of star clusters hiding in the rest of the survey! Because the appearances of star clusters vary so much, it is important for us to learn what kinds of clusters we can actually see. For this reason, we have inserted realistic synthetic clusters with known ages, masses, and sizes into some of the PHAT images. By identifying both real and synthetic clusters, we will learn what types of clusters are undetectable in Andromeda. This information is critical for understanding the age and mass distributions of the clusters by allowing us to determine whether certain populations of clusters do not exist or if they are simply avoiding detection. After you help us to find these star clusters, we will use several techniques to determine the age and mass of these objects. In some clusters, we can resolve individual stars that allow us to determine the age, mass, and other aspects of the object. In other clusters, where individual stars are too faint or too close together, we can use the summed light from a cluster to determine its properties (Fouesneau+ 2012, in prep.). With these ages and masses in hand, we can use these clusters to study a host of interesting topics: rapid and rare stages of stellar evolution, the structure and scale of star formation, the evolution of cluster populations, and how Andromeda has changed over billions of years.

4 ABOUT PARTICIPANT TASKS


4.1 Tasks description.

Mark interesting features with circles and crosses.

4.2 Interaction with system objects.

Users must identify star clusters in photographs taken of the Andromeda galaxy.

Grey typology Participation typology Contribution type:
Computing: NO Thinking: YES
Sensing: NO Gaming: NO
Crowdsourcing Distributed intelligence
Participatory science Extreme citizen science
Science outreach
Data collection
Data analysis
Data interpretation --------
Gaming
Genre: puzzle Gaming elements:
Interface
Data type to manipulate: pictures interface enjoyment: somewhat cool/attractive
Interface usability: somewhat difficult to use
Member profiles::minimal
Member profile elements: other


5 ABOUT GUIDANCE AND FEEDBACK


Guidance Feedback on
Tutorial and documentation: SOMEWHAT
Training sequence: NO
Peer to peer guidance: NO
individual performance: Somewhat
collective performance: YES
research progress: Somewhat

5.1 .

6 COMMUNITY


Tools News & Events

Communication: website, blog, forum, chat
Social Network: Twitter, Facebook

Main news site: http://talk.andromedaproject.org/chat
Frequency of project news updates: weekly
Type of events:
Frequency of events : 0

Community description

Community size (volounteers based):
Role: Forum participation and community problem solving/discussion Interaction form:Forum chat
Has official community manager(s): maybe
Has team work no

Other information about community:
Community led additions: 2013/12/05

7 OTHER PROJECT INFORMATION




Capture d’écran 2013-11-14 à 15.17.15.png No [[has completion level::High]

http://www.andromedaproject.org/#!/about/people/science-team Not explicitely specified University of Washington http://talk.andromedaproject.org/ or https://twitter.com/andromedaproj

No astronomy, astrophysics Natural sciences space Star clusters are collections of hundreds to millions of stars that were born at the same time from the same cloud of gas. This shared origin makes star clusters unique tools for understanding how stars form and evolve. Additionally, they are useful for studying the major chapters in the history of galaxies. But before Andromeda's star clusters can unlock these secrets, we need the help of Citizen Scientists to find the clusters. Not just the big bright ones, but the small faint ones as well. This is the goal of the Andromeda Project. Star clusters vary greatly in terms of mass, size, age, and local environment. As a result, star clusters can appear quite different from one another depending on the properties of the clusters and where they are located in the galaxy. This makes the process of identifying clusters tricky and difficult to automate. From the first year of PHAT data, a team of eight astronomers searched through each image, manually identifying star clusters by eye. Using less than 1/5th the total PHAT survey area, we cataloged about 600 star clusters (Johnson+ 2012). With the Andromeda Project, we hope that you will help us find the thousands of star clusters hiding in the rest of the survey!

Because the appearances of star clusters vary so much, it is important for us to learn what kinds of clusters we can actually see. For this reason, we have inserted realistic synthetic clusters with known ages, masses, and sizes into some of the PHAT images. By identifying both real and synthetic clusters, we will learn what types of clusters are undetectable in Andromeda. This information is critical for understanding the age and mass distributions of the clusters by allowing us to determine whether certain populations of clusters do not exist or if they are simply avoiding detection.

After you help us to find these star clusters, we will use several techniques to determine the age and mass of these objects. In some clusters, we can resolve individual stars that allow us to determine the age, mass, and other aspects of the object. In other clusters, where individual stars are too faint or too close together, we can use the summed light from a cluster to determine its properties (Fouesneau+ 2012, in prep.). With these ages and masses in hand, we can use these clusters to study a host of interesting topics: rapid and rare stages of stellar evolution, the structure and scale of star formation, the evolution of cluster populations, and how Andromeda has changed over billions of years. International Andromeda Project Mark interesting features with circles and crosses. data analysis, data interpretation

distributed intelligence pictures, other: Thinking: yes Computing: no Sensing: no Gaming: no

puzzle Users must identify star clusters in photographs taken of the Andromeda galaxy. somewhat cool/attractive somewhat difficult to use somewhat no no N/A yes N/A

minimal other maybe website, blog, forum, chat Twitter, Facebook

0 http://talk.andromedaproject.org/chat

weekly

Forum participation and community problem solving/discussion Forum chat no Twitter and Zooniverse AMA on reddit n/a High

Project has been retired, with some hopes of new data for 2014 to resurrect it. Project is very active and successful when where is new data to classify, but otherwise quiet.


Bibliography

BIBLIOGRAPHY
Facts about "Andromeda Project"
Has Haklay typology leveldistributed intelligence +
Has addressUniversity of Washington +
Has citizen science subject areaspace +
Has collective performance feedbackyes +
Has community-led additionsn/a +
Has community awareness toolsTwitter and Zooniverse AMA on reddit +
Has community interaction formsForum chat +
Has community managermaybe +
Has community rolesForum participation and community problem solving/discussion +
Has community toolsWebsite +, Blog +, Forum + and Instant messaging +
Has completion levelHigh +
Has contact personNot explicitely specified +
Has contact person URLhttp://talk.andromedaproject.org/ or https://twitter.com/andromedaproj +
Has data types to manipulatepictures +
Has events frequency0 +
Has field of scienceastronomy + and astrophysics +
Has individual performance feedbackN/A +
Has infrastructureZooniverse +
Has interaction with objectsUsers must identify star clusters in photographs taken of the Andromeda galaxy. +
Has interface attractivitysomewhat cool/attractive +
Has interface usabilitysomewhat difficult to use +
Has location of activitiesInternational +
Has main institutionUniversity of Washington +
Has member profile elementsother +
Has member profilesminimal +
Has participant contribution typedata analysis + and data interpretation +
Has participant task descriptionMark interesting features with circles and crosses. +
Has partner institutionsAdler Planetarium +, GLObal Robotic-telescopes Intelligent Array +, Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury +, Hubble + and Zooniverse +
Has peer to peer guidanceno +
Has project access URLhttps://www.zooniverse.org/project/andromedaproject +
Has project descriptionThe Andromeda galaxy is the closest spiral galaxy to our own Milky Way. Using PHAT data from the Hubble Space Telescope we're hunting for star clusters in Andromeda and hidden galaxies that lie behind. +
Has project end dateDecember 5, 2013 +
Has project nameAndromeda Project +
Has project news sitehttp://talk.andromedaproject.org/chat +
Has project news updatesweekly +
Has project purposeStar clusters are collections of hundreds
Star clusters are collections of hundreds to millions of stars that were born at the same time from the same cloud of gas. This shared origin makes star clusters unique tools for understanding how stars form and evolve. Additionally, they are useful for studying the major chapters in the history of galaxies. But before Andromeda's star clusters can unlock these secrets, we need the help of Citizen Scientists to find the clusters. Not just the big bright ones, but the small faint ones as well. This is the goal of the Andromeda Project.
This is the goal of the Andromeda Project. +
Has project start dateDecember 4, 2012 +
Has research progress feedbackN/A +
Has research questionStar clusters vary greatly in terms of mass +, size +, age +, and local environment. As a result +, star clusters can appear quite different f
star clusters can appear quite different from one another depending on the properties of the clusters and where they are located in the galaxy. This makes the process of identifying clusters tricky and difficult to automate. From the first year of PHAT data
automate. From the first year of PHAT data +, a team of eight astronomers searched through each image +, manually identifying star clusters by eye. Using less than 1/5th the total PHAT survey area +, we cataloged about 600 star clusters (Johnson+ 2012). With the Andromeda Project +, we hope that you will help us find the thousands of star clusters hiding in the rest of the survey! Because the appearances of star clusters vary so much +, it is important for us to learn what kinds of clusters we can actually see. For this reason +, we have inserted realistic synthetic clusters with known ages +, masses +, and sizes into some of the PHAT images. By identifying both real and synthetic clusters +, we will learn what types of clusters are u
we will learn what types of clusters are undetectable in Andromeda. This information is critical for understanding the age and mass distributions of the clusters by allowing us to determine whether certain populations of clusters do not exist or if they are simply avoiding detection. After you help us to find these star clusters
er you help us to find these star clusters +, we will use several techniques to determine the age and mass of these objects. In some clusters +, we can resolve individual stars that allow us to determine the age +, mass +, and other aspects of the object. In other clusters +, where individual stars are too faint or too close together +, we can use the summed light from a cluster to determine its properties (Fouesneau+ 2012 +, in prep.). With these ages and masses in hand +, we can use these clusters to study a host of interesting topics: rapid and rare stages of stellar evolution +, the structure and scale of star formation +, the evolution of cluster populations + and and how Andromeda has changed over billions of years. +
Has screenshotCapture d’écran 2013-11-14 à 15.17.15.png +
Has social software sitesTwitter + and Facebook +
Has subject areaNatural sciences +
Has team leaderJulianne Dalcanton +
Has team linkhttp://www.andromedaproject.org/#!/about/people/science-team +
Has team workno +
Has training sequenceno +
Has tutorials and documentationsomewhat +
Has volonteer computingno +
Has volonteer gamingno +
Has volonteer sensingno +
Has volonteer thinkingyes +
Is gaming genrepuzzle +
Is openfalse +
Last editionDecember 20, 2013 +